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Old 07-26-2020, 06:09 AM   #1
Eric20
 
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Default Is this a Sipworth Camel hub?

I have a propeller hub which has been turned into a memorabilia with a barometer at some point in time. I recently became intrigued about the markings on the hub D2590 F2650 G936 W55. D & F appear to fit a Sipworth Camel from a Clerget 130hp engine, but what I haven’t been able to figure out are the meanings of G & W numbers ... and thus might this be from a different aircraft altogether? And maybe later than WWI? All ideas, insight welcome.
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Old 07-26-2020, 07:28 AM   #2
Dbahnson
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The typical stampings are "D" and "P" for diameter and pitch (usually in millimeters), and "G" and "N" numbers are production numbers which can be correlated with the date of manufacture. (Bob Gardner has those lists. I can check in his book series if they might be mentioned there, but those numbers are not specific to an aircraft or engine, just a production sequence.)

The number profile is consistent with WW1 era, but the size is usually not specific to a single aircraft, so it's rarely possible to be certain of a single application from the information you have.
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Old 07-26-2020, 07:58 AM   #3
Eric20
 
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Thank you for the insight. There are also some markings on the inside of the hub. Someone suggested this might confirm the engine type the propeller was used in?

I used to live in Kingston near where Sipworth factory used to be and wonder if the hub could be traced back to there from the manufacturing logs?
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Old 07-26-2020, 08:51 AM   #4
Dbahnson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric20 View Post
I used to live in Kingston near where Sipworth factory used to be and wonder if the hub could be traced back to there from the manufacturing logs?
If you could find manufacturing logs then the G/N number would be relevant, but what seems to be missing on yours is is the drawing number, which references the blueprint from which it was manufactured, and that often will narrow it down to one or several aircraft models. If you find any manufacturing logs please share them here!

Most always when it's just a hub remaining it's because the propeller was damaged and discarded, then the blades were removed. More often than not, those events would occur at another airfield than the manufacturer's (or even more likely, not at an airfield at all.)

One thing you should check are the hub dimensions. Measure them accurately then go to the linked chart to see if they are at least consistent with the Clerget engine. If they are it doesn't necessarily mean it couldn't be another engine, but if they are not then it was not for that Clerget engine.
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Old 07-26-2020, 11:01 AM   #5
JR44
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I'll think you'll find it's Sopwith Camel.
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Old 08-02-2020, 08:19 AM   #6
Eric20
 
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Of course my mistake
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Old 08-02-2020, 08:33 AM   #7
Eric20
 
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Thanks for your insights and suggestions. I finally had a chance to look at the hub in more detail.

The following information is stamped onto the inside of the hub (Due to damage some info difficult to verify, indicated by ?): ?D644 ?H 130HP CLERGE? D25?0 ?26?0 G936 N5?. The D,P, G and N numbers seem to match what is on top of the hub. This would also suggest a 130HP Clerget engine and possibly a AD644 right hand design ... same as in Sopwith Camel? ... I checked the hub dimensions and the center bore and bolt circle match. Provided the hub thickness includes the front metal plate it matches, otherwise the thickness is below 6” mentioned.

Seems that I would need to get to those production details to get any further. Any idea how to go about that?
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Old 08-02-2020, 08:59 AM   #8
Dbahnson
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The AD644 is definitely consistent with a Camel.

I'd have to look through Bob Gardner's books to see if he describes dates for those numbers. He has provided dates here for specific numbers so he must have some kind of listing although I don't have that list. Hopefully he will get a a chance to see your question and respond. He has been busy with a variety of other demands lately and I don't want to interfere with his schedule.

I suppose you could look through other threads here to establish some degree of a number sequence as it correlates to date of manufacture.
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