Wooden Propeller Forum  

Go Back   Wooden Propeller Forum > Wooden Propeller Identification > "Early" Wooden Propellers

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-05-2018, 08:49 AM   #1
Del
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 3
Default Gnome Scout propeller help please

We are just starting to try to work out what we have. There are more numbers. We have the whole propeller and we would love to know what it might have been on if anyone can help.
Thank you in advance,
Del
GNOME SCOUT.jpg
Del is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2018, 04:30 PM   #2
Dbahnson
Administrator
Site Admin
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 787
Default

Please post the other numbers. Iíll try to look it up in a few days. Meanwhile a photo of the entire prop may be helpful.

You do know that the prop has been sawed in half, right?
Dbahnson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2018, 04:26 PM   #3
Bob Gardner
Moderator
 
Bob Gardner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The North of England
Posts: 1,641
Default

Del,

Your prop was made by the prop shop of the British & Colonial Aeroplane Co (commonly called Bristol's) for one of their aircraft, a Scout C.

The hub data translates as

G130 N7 Prop 7 in the batch number 130 which dates from late 1917
7969 Bristol's serial number
P3000 The prop drawing number where P indicates Bristol's
80hp Gnome Scout The 80hp Gnome engine used in the Bristol Scout C

Bristol's were paid twelve pounds and fifteen shillings for each prop.

Your prop is very probably made of walnut

The diameter of the prop is 2500mm. The pitch is 2200mm.

Bristol received a contract to make two batches of 100 props, one for the Bristol Scout, one for the Sopwith Pup, which used the same engine. Your prop comes from the batch marked for the Sopwith Pup. Both props were identical.

It was cut in half by the man who took it home as a souvenir. A complete prop would not fit in his seat on the train to Calais nor very well in the train or bus from Folkstone to his home.

With kind regards,

Bob
__________________
Bob Gardner
Author; WW1 British Propellers, WWI German Propellers
http://www.aeroclocks.com
Bob Gardner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2018, 07:08 PM   #4
Del
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 3
Default

Hi Bob,
Thank you so very much for the reply. It was my late fathers prop and I have wanted to know more about if for many years - I am amazed and thrilled that so much can be told ! I know absolutely nothing about propellers so some of the info is a bit head scratching for me but I am fascinated. I am giggling (and a bit cross !) at the thought of somebody cutting it in half to get it home !! We did wonder why it had been cut. It's a beautiful thing and it's lovely to know it is now over a hundred years old. I will post a photo of the whole thing and the other numbers this week hoping it might be of help to researchers.
You have made my week, thank you again
Del
Del is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2018, 07:10 PM   #5
Del
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 3
Default

Hi there,
Thank you for the reply. I will post a photo of the whole thing and all the numbers this week - am thrilled to have found out so much
Del
Del is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2018, 07:21 PM   #6
Dbahnson
Administrator
Site Admin
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 787
Default

The cut in the hub isn't a big deal for display purposes, and there's likely a history behind it that could be interesting if it were known. I'm not sure if that's an original hub assembly, but that also adds to its appearance (and it helps hold it together while concealing some of the cut).

I hope your family has continued interest in it and that it can be passed down to heirs. It will only become more rare and unusual over time, particularly considering that it was use on this airplane, which you aren't going to see flying overhead any more.


Attached Images
File Type: jpg Lanoe_Hawker's_No_1611_Bristol_Scout_C.jpg (45.0 KB, 7 views)
Dbahnson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2018, 07:24 AM   #7
Bob Gardner
Moderator
 
Bob Gardner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: The North of England
Posts: 1,641
Default

Del,

Don't worry about the prop being cut in two. It's a perfectly genuine and acceptable part of its history. I see several like it quite often. And the brass hub plate largely disguises the cut.

If you want to improve its condition and protect it from more ageing, try gentle cleaning with lukewarm water with a few drops of washing up liquid in it. The washing up liquid will act as a degreaser. Clean one small area at a time. Don't flood it with water. Clean it gently. You might wish to try cleaning first a small portion on the back of the hub by way of an experiment.

When the surface has been cleaned in this way, leave to dry for a few days.

Now, polish it with pure beeswax, again with small amounts of polish each time. And again test the polish on a small part of the prop out of sight, to see if there is any adverse reaction, such as blooming.

You must use pure bees wax out of a tin purchased at B & Q. You will note that several modern polishes and aerosols of polish claim to have beeswax in them. Don't use them. The silicones in modern polishes are far too strong for antique wood and can disrupt the finish and cause blooms. Use pure beeswax out of a tin.

We would like you to post some close-ups of your work, before and after, for the edification of other visitors to our web-site.

With kind regards,

Bob
__________________
Bob Gardner
Author; WW1 British Propellers, WWI German Propellers
http://www.aeroclocks.com
Bob Gardner is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9 Beta 3
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.