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Old 02-06-2018, 01:47 PM   #11
Bob Gardner
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Trevor,

Thank you for the photographs. I regret they are of very poor quality and nothing further can be learned from them, except that the data stamped on them is certainly of the same age as the hubs.

Thank you for telling us about them.

With kind regards,

Bob
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Old 02-06-2018, 11:01 PM   #12
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Hi,

The second one is clearly a Chauvière prop: a pic of the complete prop may confirm that but the markings, IMHO, are clear:
- IPC at the top
- DC 256 is probably DG 256
- Engine and plane (Henry Farman fitted with a Gnome 80HP)
- B 21038.
I don't know what they mean, but the English Chauvière have this DG xxx and Bxxxxx. I suspect that the B something is a prop number (a batch number seems too high!), and if true this prop is a late one but no more late that IPC did exist in England!

It's sure that better pics could be easier!

Regards,
PM
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Old 02-07-2018, 06:19 AM   #13
Bob Gardner
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Bonjour Mon Ami,

Yes! Pity about the photographs. I recall that I used to tell forumites to take the photographs in focus and well lit, to photograph both sides and any small numbers such as AID numbers. But I thought it was rather rude of me and I did not like doing it. Perhaps I shall start again.

I believe that both of these props must have been experimental props. For example, to find the best prop possible for these aircraft, the Vickers Gunbus FB14; and the H Farman.

Cordialement,

Bob
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Old 02-07-2018, 11:28 AM   #14
Dbahnson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Gardner View Post

I believe that both of these props must have been experimental props.

Bob
Keep in mind that manufacturers, at least in the U.S, often did "whirling tests" which involved ground spinning them to failure of the blades. So I would expect some of those hubs to have been saved as souvenirs of sorts and maybe trimmed down for neatness.

I'm curious about this photo showing the hub cut in the middle. Note that the thickness of opposing surfaces don't match in size, suggesting that some material may be missing and may have included stamped information as well. What does the face of the hub look like? There's no good reason to cut a hub if the blades have been removed. The only purpose I've seen is to shorten the prop into two pieces to make easier to transport, knowing that it will only be used for display and can be re-assembled at the hub for display purposes.
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