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Kenw
07-12-2015, 01:27 PM
Hello,

Thank you for setting up this forum! I am interested in info about my prop. I was told Circa 1910.

Any help in identifying maker and what aircraft it came from would be appreciated.

Many Thanks.

Bob Gardner
07-12-2015, 05:25 PM
Welcome KenW,

Dave Bahnson, who founded this forum put a lot of work and money (buying the software etc) into it, and he will be delighted to read your appreciation.

Your prop doesn't date from 1910. It was made by the Lang Propeller Company which was founded in 1912 at which time six bolt holes were sufficient to cope with the low power of the aero engines of the time. Your prop has eight bolt holes and so dates from 1915 to 1919. Most Lang props were made in Britain, mostly for Sopwith aircraft. Some were made by Lang in the USA for the USN. Which country do you live in? Tell us any data stamped on or around the hub and we may be able to identify which aircraft it was made for. If it's difficult to read, take several photographs for us. Also measure the prop from tip to tip in cm.

With kind regards,

Bob

Kenw
07-12-2015, 10:14 PM
Thank you so much for your prompt reply. I had looked through the pictures, and considered the possibility of it being a Lang due to the diamond shape, but I had no idea that it may have been used on a Camel! Wonderful news! I do not want to sell it, but I would be interested in knowing a ball park value. Thank you for sharing your knowledge with me.

Best regards,
Kenw

Bob Gardner
07-13-2015, 10:11 AM
Kenw,

There is no evidence that your prop was made for a Camel and very probably it wasn't.

Lang designed about 7000 different props. He made at least 15,000 from 1912 to 1919. He made props for at least twenty aircraft designs other than Sopwith's. At least six other makers were contracted to make props of his design which probably amounts to at least another 12,000. He also made several thousand in the USA for the USN.

When the Air Board was formed in mid 1917, it ran comparative tests between the different designs available from several different makers which were available for each aircraft. It was found that the Admiralty prop design for the Camel was better than Lang's and this became the selected prop for the Camel, although one of Lang's designs was also specified as a standard prop.

If you can find the data stamped on your prop we can tell you what type of aircraft it was built for. If you only tell us the length of your prop we might be able to narrow its useage down to 2-3 types of aircraft. Then we can tell you what it might be worth.

With kind regards,

Bob

Kenw
07-13-2015, 12:07 PM
Thank you so much for your prompt reply, and thank you for sharing your knowledge with me. It is about 104 inches. Many thanks.