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Garuda
07-30-2012, 12:18 AM
Hi everyone,

A couple of years ago on The Aerodrome I had some requests for some 1/8 scale Axial propellers to suit the Hasegawa Fokker triplane. I have been measuring and studying an original Garuda propeller, also for the Oberursal U.R.II, so I could build these in 1/8 scale, or any other scale as required too. They were not fitted to the Fokker triplane in service, but they were fitted to the Fokker E.V and D.VIII, so if anyone is building a model (or even a full sized) Fokker parasol I could build one for you.

I had lost track of who needed propellers, but I recently received an e-mail from a member who was one of those who wanted a 1/8 scale Axial propeller, so I have started to make one. It is nearly finished, so I thought it was time to post some photos of the progress I have been making on this propeller. The first one is a generic one built from the drawings I have. I have been told that it was drawn from measurements taken from an original propeller, which I am sure that it was, but it has perfectly even laminations, which I don't believe to be typical of German propellers. The Garuda propeller, for example has laminations varying from about 11mm to 35mm or more and they are not even parallel to each other!

My plan is to build some more specific propellers with the typical variations in lamination order and thickness, but that will take time and I only have the generic one and the associated formers for it at the moment.

The photos are of the laminations stacked together, although not in their exact final locations, front and rear views, the laminations seperated and laying adjacent to each other, and the formers I have made in order to align each lamination when I glue them together.

I hope you enjoy the photos, and I will look forward to hearing from Sam, or anyone else who would like such a propeller built.

slhetal
08-05-2012, 06:08 AM
Looks great!
Sam

Garuda
08-06-2012, 06:05 AM
Hi Sam,

It's great to see you on here! :)

Thanks very much for the e-mail. I'm out of credit at the moment, so I can't reply to your e-mail using my iPhone, and the notebook I mostly use is not powerful enough to be able to reply to you. I need a much more powerful computer! I've been told that notebooks have very limited processing power, and it certainly seems to be the case.

Thank you very much for the photos. At first when you said that there were two larger holes on either side of the smaller hole I thought that you meant that they were on the sides - out towards the blades, but I can see what you mean from the photos. The larger holes are either side of the smaller hole, but are in front of and behind the smaller hole. Are the measurements you provided in inches? What is the depth of the larger holes? I will need to copy the centre hole as accurately as possible, so that the propeller sits on your engine as accurately as possible. It won't be an exact match to the original, but it will not be seen so it won't matter. The only other holes on the original are around the central hole, although I assume that your scale engine has a front plate, which will cover them anyway. If the front plate has 8 nuts represented on its' front face, they are the nuts for the bolts which go through the propeller and the 8 holes I mentioned.

I will look forward to hearing from you Sam, and I will post progress photos on here as I am able to.

Regards,

David.

slhetal
08-30-2012, 03:15 AM
Hi David,
Any more progress?
Sam

Garuda
08-30-2012, 08:14 AM
Hi Sam,

My iPhone died, which has all the progress photos on it, and was the only practical way I had to access my e-mail. I've been able to re activate the phone I was using before I bought the iPhone (I had to get it unlocked) and might be able to post some photos using this phone, although it doesn't have e-mail so we'll have to chat here until I can get another smart phone. I've also got a couple of digital cameras, so I might be able to post some photos from one of them. I will post some photos as soon as I am able to!

Regards,

David.

Batleyr
09-12-2012, 08:47 AM
Hi David,

I just stumbled across this thread while looking into the Hasegawa Dr1 and was wondering if I might be able to get you to make me one of the propellers.

Regards,

Ryan

Garuda
09-12-2012, 05:50 PM
Hi Ryan,

No problem!

It shouldn't take me anywhere near as long to build subsequent propellers as it has taken to build the first one for Sam! :oops: The patterns are by far the most time consuming component. Added to that my keyboard doesn't work properly and my iPhone died with all my photos on it but I will try to post some more progress photos as soon as possible!

Regards,

David.

Batleyr
09-18-2012, 09:55 PM
That would be fantastic, thank you very much.

slhetal
09-25-2012, 04:53 AM
Hi David,
Any new progress?
Sam

Garuda
10-03-2012, 09:56 AM
Hi Sam,

I'm still having IT nightmares here. :( I've got my digital camera working but I haven't been able to find a cable for it so far, even though I was able to find both boxes for both digital cameras. I was sure I would have had at least one cable in the boxes. I took some photos with my mobile phone but again I can't find a cable and I wasn't able to send the images using Bluetooth. I will get a cable in the next few days and post some photos as soon as possible.

I've been working on the patterns which isn't very exciting but it's crucial to get them accurately made, and I hope to glue some laminations together soon.

Regards,

David.

Garuda
10-11-2012, 08:24 PM
Hi Sam and Ryan,

I've bought a card reader, so I will attach a photo of the template for the outline of the propeller. I will take and post more photos as time permits, but as soon as possible of course.

Regards,

David.

Garuda
10-13-2012, 01:15 PM
The second outside profile added to show how it will determine the outside shape. I'll try to get some more photos soon.

Garuda
11-05-2012, 06:28 AM
Laminations 1 and 2 glued together

Garuda
11-05-2012, 06:51 AM
Lamination 3

Garuda
11-05-2012, 06:33 PM
Lamination 4

Garuda
11-05-2012, 06:36 PM
Lamination 5

slhetal
11-06-2012, 05:25 AM
WOW, it's looking great David!
Sam

Garuda
11-06-2012, 05:59 AM
Thanks Sam! :D I knew you would like it! You will be surprised at how thin the tips are, but it's built to the drawings I have, and is an exact scale replica of the real thing. I was shaping lamination 6 today. Tomorrow, unless something else comes up I will sand it to its' correct thickness, check and finally sand it to shape and glue it on.

Lamination 7 is also cut to shape but also needs sanding to the correct thickness, and final sanding of the outline.

Regards,

David.

Garuda
11-08-2012, 10:19 PM
Lamination 6

Garuda
11-08-2012, 10:26 PM
Lamination 7

slhetal
11-09-2012, 04:37 AM
FANTASTIC!!!
Sam

Garuda
11-09-2012, 05:18 PM
Thanks Sam! :D It's very close now!

I have tried, without success so far to have some Axial logos made up. Would you like me to keep trying, or just send it as it is?

I am not sure of the exact wording of the stamps on the blade, and could finish it with beezwax or varnish, unless you would like to finish it yourself. You will need to send me your address soon, so I can send it to you.

Next I will make one for Ryan and experiment with a few specific propellers such as the ones fitted to Voss' Fokker F.1, von Hippel's Dr.1 or any other Axial propeller I can obtain a good photograph of.

slhetal
11-10-2012, 05:32 AM
Hi David,
Just send the propeller as is. I'll obtain the logos and varnish it. Can I email my address to you? Is your email address still the same?
Sam

Garuda
11-10-2012, 12:19 PM
Hi Sam,

Thanks for letting me know. It's the easiest option for me. In time I will be able to source logos or print them myself.

Yes, my e-mail address still works. My computer wasn't allowing me to open e-mail for a while but it's working again now. I saw your message and yes, please send me your address via e-mail or PM.

Regards,

David.

slhetal
11-11-2012, 05:26 AM
Done. I'll post a picture of the completed propeller next to the Hasegawa Fokker DR-1 plastic propeller in order to demonstrate the dramatic difference.
Sam

Garuda
11-11-2012, 06:17 AM
That will be great Sam!

I've been sanding it and it's getting very close now. I will post some photos of it soon.

Thanks for sending your address and for the photos of your work. You are a master woodworker! Did you think about making a propeller yourself?
The one I have made is Ash and Mahogany, although I have seen Achim Engels make references to Brich and Walnut, so I am not so sure now what the originals were made of. I've had the original Garuda propeller examined a few times and even the experts can't agree with each other about the species used.

Batleyr
11-13-2012, 05:49 PM
Hi David,

That is looking excellent, I really appreciate you building one for me.

Ryan

Garuda
11-13-2012, 09:06 PM
Hi Ryan,

I am very happy to build a propeller for you. Is your model of any particular Dr.1, or would you like a standard one, like the first one I have built for Sam?

Batleyr
11-14-2012, 09:34 PM
I am looking to represent either DR1 127/17 or 152/17, all my research seems to indicate the standard seven laminations, 4 of birch and 3 of walnut. If you have any information to the contrary I am happy to defer to your judgement.

Ryan

Garuda
11-15-2012, 09:26 AM
Thanks for letting me know Ryan.

I have a photo of each aeroplane but the propeller is in shade in both photos. I have more photos somewhere, particularly of 152. Do you have any photos you could post or send me if they show the laminations used on these particular aeroplanes?

I have seen the same specifications written but examination of original propellers and photos clearly demonstrates that they were not strictly built to specification, and no two propellers were identical. The lamination thickness and orders vary considerably from one aeroplane to the next.

If we can't find a good photograph, or if you're not worried about it I will build it as a standard propeller. From my research I believe it was common to use at least two, but sometimes three species, and perhaps more in any given propeller.

Garuda
11-16-2012, 08:16 PM
I've found a much better photo of 152 / '17 but the laminations are not particularly clear. Here's a good photo which clearly shows three species, probably Mahogany, Walnut and Ash or Birch.

Batleyr
11-19-2012, 09:55 PM
Hi David,

I am having the same problems, all photos that I can find have the tailplane in the foreground, hindering a good view of the propeller. I would be extremely happy with the seven layer lamination I mentioned earlier, as this is suggested in Paul Leaman's excellent book on the Fokker Dr1. It also contains the typical propeller indentification stamping layout - is their any way to incorporate this into your example?

Garuda
11-26-2012, 12:14 PM
Hi Ryan,

I had a response typed but I had to re - start the computer, so I lost it. A detailed response such as this can take hours to type because my keyboard does not work properly.

So, a standard propeller it is then. Interestingly, I don't think a single German propeller would have been built with such perfectly regular laminations but the drawings depict what a typical propeller might have looked like if built strictly to specifications.

If you would like a propeller with 4 laminations of Birch and 3 laminations of Walnut, I have only noted this apparent combination on 139 / '17, from Jasta 11, flown by Ltn von Conta. Others, such as 141 / '17, 154 / '17, 163 / '17 and 203 / '17 have two layers, in each of these cases the extreme front and rear laminations made from Ash or Birch, and the remaining laminations are Mahogany and / or Walnut. A triplane believed to have been 212 / '17 of Jasta 2 and another triplane, possibly from Jasta 15, in front of which Ltn Hans Müller posed for a photo had two laminations of Ash and / or Birch mixed in, more towards the centre.

I could simply reverse the order of the laminations if you would like me to, so that there is Ash or Birch at the front and rear of the propeller, and then alternate the Mahogany or Walnut, resulting in a simulation of 4 laminations of birch and 3 laminations of walnut.

I have been using Ash and Mahogany, which are the species my research has indicated were used in the manufacture of German propellers. I now believe that at least three, and possibly four or more species were commonly used. I have had an original Garuda propeller examined on many occasions, and even the experts can't agree amongst themselves whether the light timber is Ash, Birch or even Elm. The fact that Achim Engels and Paul Leaman have specified Birch must be given very careful consideration. They are both very well known and respected experts in their fields. I believe that at 1-8 scale Australian Ash, which I used in the first propeller represents Ash, Elm and / or Birch quite well, and it is plentiful so I will use it unless you specifically would like Birch. I don't, however believe that the large, open grain will be convincing at such a relatively small scale unless, perhaps it was used strictly as quarter sawn timber. Mahogany works quite well at 1-8 scale, as I assu0e Walnut would as well. I should be able to obtain Walnut quite easily, so I could use it if you would like me to.

I am very interested in incorporating the stamps! I should buy the book, but in the meantime if you could post a copy here or send me an image of the typical stamps used I will see what I can do.

Regards,

David.

slhetal
11-28-2012, 05:39 AM
Hi David,
How is the sanding process coming along?
Sam

Garuda
11-28-2012, 08:41 AM
Hi Sam,

I had nearly finished sanding the propeller, but I noticed some glue lines so I had to go back to a more coarse grade.

I took some photos a few days ago and will post them now. It takes a long time to type any response, so I will keep this one short, and will post some more photos soon.

Regards,

David.

slhetal
11-29-2012, 06:06 AM
David,
It is beautiful!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Sam

Garuda
12-14-2012, 12:42 AM
Thanks Sam! :D

I've been sanding it with 120 grade sand paper but it's not removing the deeper ridges so I will see if there's a grade in between.

I've also been working on a profile tracer, so that subsequent propellers will hopefully not take anywhere near as long as this one.

If you read this, Ryan, I would like to know if you would like me to build a "standard" propeller like this one, but with the species reversed, which would give the appearance of the laminations you specified.

Regards,

David.

slhetal
12-14-2012, 05:57 AM
David,
Go ahead and send it to me. I'll take it from here.
Sam

Garuda
12-14-2012, 07:46 AM
OK Sam, no problem!

I've seen your work and it is clear to me that you could make a propeller to that standard too! :)

Some of the glue lines are still too thick, and be very careful not to over - sand it. It's not as easy as you might think, I'm sure you'll see what I mean.

Cheers,

David.

Batleyr
12-18-2012, 05:29 AM
Hi David,

That would be great. I will pm you the other details as discussed in the next couple of days. My apologies for not replying for a while, have been flat out.

Ryan

slhetal
12-19-2012, 05:14 AM
David,
Thanks for all your great work. I'll post pictures when I've finished the propeller.
Sam

Batleyr
01-07-2013, 04:17 AM
Hi David,

Here is that information from Paul Leaman's book

Ryan

slhetal
01-16-2013, 06:20 AM
Hi David,
Did you get a chance to send the propeller yet?
Sam

slhetal
02-24-2013, 05:13 AM
David,
The propeller arrived and looks great! When compared to the Hasegawa DR-1 propeller it is unbelievable. Your propeller is so much better and more accurate! Thanks for all your hard work. Anyone else looking for a magnificent 1:8 scale propeller need look no further, ask David for one!!
Sam

slhetal
02-24-2013, 05:15 AM
Here's another shot of the comparison.
Sam

Garuda
02-26-2013, 09:11 AM
Hi Sam,

As discussed by e-mail, the propeller was sent a few weeks ago now, and I am very happy to hear that it has arrived! I was starting to worry about it, since surely it should have only taken a week or so at the most, but the main thing is that it has arrived.

I am very happy that you are so happy with it! I would have sent it late last year, except that I really felt that the trailing edge adjacent to the hub needed some repairs, and modification of the shape. I had over sanded it and it was too round. The sharper lines are more correct, and being at the back it won't be a major issue.

The drawings I have aren't particularly high resolution, and after an extensive search I eventually found a photo which confirmed the sharper lines at the back of the propeller.

Thank you very much for your patience and support Sam! I'm working on a duplicating machine, so that future propellers won't involve so much tedious work. In the future I will keep at least one on hand as a pattern, and I should be able to knock them out relatively quickly.

Hi Ryan,

Thank you very much for posting the information from Paul Leamans' book.

I can't see it particularly clearly on this computer, but hopefully soon I will have a much better computer set up, and will be able to have a better look at it.

I'm sorry about the infrequent replies. This computer has a group of keys which don't type the letters correctly, so I have to copy and paste letters. It's a very slow and tedious task to even type a brief reply.

Best regards from Australia,

David.

slhetal
04-21-2013, 12:36 PM
Hi David,
I'm making some progress on the propeller for the Fokker DR-1.
Sam

Garuda
04-22-2013, 08:06 AM
Hi Sam,

It's looking great! :) Did you varnish it? Did you sand it very much after you received it? Have you modified the centre hole so that it will fit onto the Hasegawa kit supplied engine? I forgot to do that before I sent it, sorry! I was more concerned about fixing the back of the propeller, near the boss, and sanding the propeller to the correct shape. It would be great to see it fitted to your triplane! :D

Regards,

David.

slhetal
04-24-2013, 06:06 AM
Hi David,
Only had to do minimal sanding and then a single coat of varnish. I just used a single coat of varnish because I don't want it to look plastic, I want the wood grain to show. The wood you used really stands out in dramatic fashion after the single coat of varnish. Have not modified the center hole yet, only want to do the bare minimum when I'm ready to attach to the engine. Thanks again for the fantastic job on the propeller, it's really a work of art!!
Sam

Garuda
07-04-2013, 08:22 AM
Well done Sam!

I have noticed that original propellers tend to have a very light coat of varnish. Some experts even suggested that the finish might be French polish, or a similar finish when I provided an original propeller in original condition for them to examine. Having asked some Internationally renowned experts I am now reasonably confident that the finish was generally varnish, which was my original understanding. You have done the right thing by not applying it too heavily.

The timber species used are Australian Ash - which I suspect is much more closely related to our Australian gum trees than the European Ash used in the original propellers - and Fijiian or Honduran Mahogany. Australian Ash is a good visual match, particularly for a scale propeller, and shares most, if not all of the most important structural qualities of European Ash. Fijiian and Honduran Mahogany are reputed to be genetically identical to Brazilian Mahogany, which is used in the original propellers, and is also very convincing in a scale propeller. I have plenty of European Ash offcuts, but the grain is very large, and the summer growth rings are very porous. It would not be convincing at all in a scale propeller. The particular pieces of Australian Ash I used for your propeller had a very gnarly, angry grain and were very difficult to work with, but some of the pieces have a very nice affect when the light strikes them at certain angles, which replicates the effect I have seen in original propellers quite well. Most of the Ash pieces were planed in the thickness planer to a few mm over size and were sanded to their final thickness by hand. It was a very time consuming exercise! Next time I will try to find another species which is much easier to work with. The Mahogany was much softer to work with, and the grain was much straighter.

Regards,

David.

rpcz
08-10-2013, 07:35 PM
Hi David,

I am also one of the person looking at a plastic prop on the Hasegawa DR.1. Would you still have time to fabricate a laminated prop for me?

Kind regards,
Rob

Garuda
08-10-2013, 08:56 PM
Hi Rob,

Absolutely no problem! I am very happy to make a 1:8 scale propeller for you. Presumably you already have the plastic propeller supplied in the kit, which by all accounts is not particularly accurate or realistic. I don't know how accurate the drawings I have are, but they were drawn by Achim Engels, so I would be very surprised if they are not the most accurate drawings for an Axial 110PS Oberursal propeller available. I only have very low resolution drawings and Achim is not releasing drawings any more, but I was surprised at how realistic the one I made for Sam turned out to be. It is a very angular design, which can be seen in original photographs of original propellers, but I was surprised at how angular it was. If, for example you look at the propeller in side elevation the front and rear of the propeller are completely flat about a third of the way from the centre towards the tip on the rear and nearly half way out towards the tip on the front. At a glance it looks very similar to but more angular than the Garuda propeller with the same specifications (although I understand that the Garuda made propeller was only used on the E.V / D.VIII, and not on the Dr.1) but it is much more angular when studied closely. It took me a while to get used to the strange angles and geometry, but when the propeller was finished I was very happy with it, and comparing it to photographs revealed that the drawings appear to be correct.

Is your model of any particular Dr.1, or is it going to be left uncovered? I guess most Hasegawa Fokker Dr.1's are left uncovered when finished. The reason I ask is that when I built the first propeller for Sam I took quite a lot of time to construct some templates, which was necessary for the construction of the propeller. This time I will make some more templates, which I really wanted to construct last time, but I didn't want to keep Sam waiting too long! It took quite a few months to make the first one, and I will try to be quicker this time but it is not an easy task and takes a lot of time.

Regards,

David.

rpcz
08-11-2013, 07:30 AM
Goodmorning David,
Thanks for quick and positive response.
The plastic prop supplied with the kit is indeed far from realistic. For a while I have been tracing a Hachette prop for the DR.1 but without success, so I have abandoned that route.
I am still struggling with my intentional idea to cover half of the model. The colour scheme would be either of DR.1 545/17 of Ltn. Hans Weiss (Jasta 11) or DR.1 586/17 of Ltn. Hans Kirschstein (Jasta 6).
Number of laminations of the propellers are still very puzzling. Trying to find more info.
Regards, Rob

Garuda
08-12-2013, 09:10 PM
No problem Rob!

Sam posted a comparison photo of the propeller I made for him and the plastic propeller supplied in the Hasegawa kit. The plastic kit propeller looks to be about the right shape and size but it does not have the distinctive laminations, and is not made from timber. What is the Hachette prop you mentioned? Do you mean you were tracing one or chasing one?

Half covering the triplane could be very effective, and I will be interested to hear what you decide to do as far as this is concerned. The reason I asked whether you had a particular triplane in mind is that every aeroplane had a distinctly different number and combination of laminations. If you are not worried about this level of detail I will just build a generic one. Interestingly, I have never seen photographic or physical (by examining a real propeller) evidence that the laminations were even and alternated in species in a predictable manner as shown in the drawings I have. In practice laminations can vary from about 11mm to 35mm or more, and they are not necessarily parallel to each other. The laminations can run out by as much as 5mm or 10mm on full sized original propellers, so using the laminations as reference planes is not necessarily an accurate way to measure a German propeller. There might be more extreme variations than the figures I have quoted, but these figures are from an original propeller I have measured. What appears in a photograph to be one lamination can in fact be two or more laminations of various thicknesses glued in sequence. There are some photographs in existence which show what appears to be examples of propellers which are made almost completely with Mahogany and / or Walnut, with one or perhaps two laminations of Ash and / or Birch (or possibly Elm, according to some sources).

The more you look into the number of laminations and the species they were made of the more confused you will become! I have had an original propeller examined on a few occasions and even expert furniture restorers can't agree amongst themselves about the species used. I believe that most propellers manufactured for use on the Fokker triplane and other contemporary designs were made of European Ash and Brazilian Mahogany, with some Walnut used in some cases. Earlier in the war even German propellers were often all one species. They appear to be made from Mahogany in many or perhaps most cases, although they could just as easily be made from Walnut. I have even seen an Axial propeller which appears to be made from Oak only. The reason I think it is Oak and not Ash is due to the presence of a Medullary Ray, which is one of the identifying features of Oak. Achim Engels and others have mentioned Walnut and Birch, so this should be taken into consideration, and taken seriously.

If you have a good photo of the aeroplane you decide to model, and it shows the number, combination and sequence of the laminations I could try to replicate these details for you if you would like me to. If you are not concerned about this level of detail, don't have a good photo showing the laminations of the propeller or decide not to half cover the triplane, thus replicating a specific triplane I could just build a generic propeller for you. As you can see from the one I built for Sam it still looks very convincing, even though I do not believe, or at least have never seen any evidence that German propellers were ever built with such precision. They seemed to use whatever was available at the time to a large extent, and they did not always alternate the species in a strict, predictable fashion. Each lamination seems to have been planed to the maximum thickness which was practical for that particular piece of timber. Laminations are typically joined lengthways as well. Typically each lamination is two or three boards wide.

Regards,

David.

rpcz
08-14-2013, 02:42 PM
Goodmorning David,

The propellor supplied with the DR.1 "Hachette" kit was a wooden one as per the early Hasegawa kit. However, this propeller was not the scale neither the type were i was looking for.

I have decided to cover half of the triplane (586/17) using the "black & white" dazzle stripes used by Ltn Hans Kirschstein (Jasta 6).

This same triplane was flown at a later date by Ltn. Ernst Udet of Jasta 4 with an added LO marking. Although, some discussions are going on if Udet changed the B&W striping into a "Blue and Red"stripping.

Based on the description of Jasta 6 pilot Richard Wenzl and the photo in Franz Hemer's diary, I am convinced that the B&W striping is the correct one.

Regarding the lamination of the propellor, you are more than right. The more you look at the available photo material, the more difficult it gets. The number of laminations on the photos vary from 1 - 7.
Although, I have seen somewhere (but can not find it anymore) on the internet or books that a 7 layer system was used for fabrication of the propellers???

What I have seen on the available photo material of the 586/17 is that the propeller is very dark colored. On some photo's you can see some lamination shading.
Based on this i presume that only dark types of timber were used for this particular propeller.

Kind regards and awaiting your comment/response,
Rob

Garuda
08-21-2013, 06:56 AM
Hi again Rob,

I remember now seeing your reply. If I don't reply straight away I'm likely to forget or get distracted, so I apologise for the delay.

That's a very nice colour scheme Rob! It will look absolutely stunning half covered. Do you have larger photos which show the laminations more clearly? In at least one of the photos the propeller looks like a British, or more likely French built le Rhone propeller, rather than the distinctive Axial propeller. Bear in mind that other German companies such as Heine made propellers for the Oberursal and / or the le Rhone, where fitted.

Regarding the reported 7 layers, Achim Engels specifies this, and alludes to Paul Lehman also specifying 7 layers in his book. From my experience it is not so easy to generalise. The number of laminations, species used and the order in which they are used vary enormously, as do lamination thicknesses.

I had a website which I co - founded and from which I was expelled, along with one of the other administrators, who has since started his own Forum. Neither of us believe we did anything wrong, and we were both cheated out of about $1,000. I have recently joined his Forum, and I noticed that there is a thread titled "Props now available". I will post a link to this thread on his site, and will post a link to his site here in this thread. I am sure it will be of great interest to many members here.

I have not read the thread in its' entirety but I will continue to read it. So far I have only seen reference to 1:32 scale propellers. I don't think propellers as large as 1:8 are offered. Presumably they are for plastic kits, but I will keep reading with great interest!

http://forum.ww1aircraftmodels.com/index.php?topic=1127.0;topicseen

Regards,

David.

rpcz
08-22-2013, 02:10 PM
Hi David,
Thanks for your response. Number of laminations will always stay a point of discussion. On the photos I attached earlier, you indeed can see whatever you wish to see on number of laminations and color.
What can be concluded from the photos that the DR1 586/17 ahd different propellers. On the smaller photos the propellor seems less wide as on the larger photo.
The larger photo is from the latter period Ltn Udet was flying the 586/17 i.e. probably the propeller has been replaced.

Have been in contact with Douglas Craner in the UK via the ww1aircraftmodels forum.
Your initial assumption was correct that the propellers Doug manufactures were to a 1:32 scale. Although, Doug confirmed his willingness to manufacture a propeller on a 1:8 scale.
Doug is of the same opinion that the photos show different make propellers (Axial for the smaller photos and Wollfe or Garuda for the larger photo).

Since I am not building the Udet version, it becomes clear to me that the propellor should be a Axial one. Do the propellers manufactured by Axial also differ in number of laminations?
Regards,
Rob

Batleyr
09-29-2013, 03:45 AM
Hi David,

I haven't logged in to the forum for quite a while, but I thought I'd check in and see if you were still producing one of your fine DR1 props for me?

Ryan

Nighto
11-20-2013, 05:01 PM
hello there
i couldnt find the laminates thickness of this fokker in ur thread .
i have a better vector version of that propeller , but i dont have the proper laminates thickness relative to the propeller diameter , so how did u figure out the right thickness

regards Nighto

slhetal
11-26-2013, 06:15 AM
If someone needs a correct propeller for their Fokker DR-1 then I can attest that there is no better propeller builder than David. I did six months worth of research on Fokker propellers before I contacted David. I have built several scratch built mahogany antique speed boats. I have also been a project manager on building several custom electric guitars where we used maple and mahogany combined (mahogany bodies and maple tops). We also used various burled woods for laminations. In short, I love to see beautiful woodwork and appreciate the artisans who can do that work. I am extremely happy with the 1:8 scale propeller that David did for me. If anyone has any questions or needs pictures then please contact me via a note in this forum. Thanks!!
Sam Hornsby
South Florida

Nighto
11-26-2013, 07:26 PM
If someone needs a correct propeller for their Fokker DR-1 then I can attest that there is no better propeller builder than David. I did six months worth of research on Fokker propellers before I contacted David. I have built several scratch built mahogany antique speed boats. I have also been a project manager on building several custom electric guitars where we used maple and mahogany combined (mahogany bodies and maple tops). We also used various burled woods for laminations. In short, I love to see beautiful woodwork and appreciate the artisans who can do that work. I am extremely happy with the 1:8 scale propeller that David did for me. If anyone has any questions or needs pictures then please contact me via a note in this forum. Thanks!!
Sam Hornsby
South Florida

but who is David I wanna contact him . is he is a member in this forum , or u know him from out side , anyway - here or out side - I need his profile link or his e-mail so i can take some of his great experience , I expect that he will not refuse to help :) .

maxim08
01-12-2014, 09:13 AM
Garuda

Just found and read this thread. Please post more photos of your finished propellors!

Currently I am working on a full size Heine for the Fokker D V II, see my thread somewhere else on this forum. I do agree with you re lamination thickness and the seemingly random nature of them. Must have been challenging since one set of templates would not necessarily work for a different set of thicknesses.

I have measured 3 original Heines for the D VII and each differs in wood types and lamination thicknesses. The current project uses;15, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 5, back to front. My original is almost the reverse with the 5mm layer at the back and all laminations are mahogany. The first that I measured, in a museum, had similar layer thicknesses to mine but different species, a much more traditional ash, ash, mahogany, ash etc.

Each of these used wood with splices both along the length and width. Many had been widened at the hub to get the required width and there are many more knots than I ever thought acceptable.

I suspect that all this really means is that there was no strict formula. Maybe a preferred process/specification, but making do with what was on hand to achieve the end goal. BTW overall dimensions don't appear to change no matter what wood species etc was used.

Really like your work.

Regards
John